Migration in (out of) Context – My Story

My name is Agrin, I am 25 years old and I am from Syria. I left my country together with my husband because of the war. My husband had a store in Syria and he was earning well, our financial situation was good there. But his store got bombed and part of my university was bombed as well. At that...

Migration in (out of) Context – My Story

My name is Ali and I am 29 years old. I come from Kurdistan, a region in Iraq. I left my country 8 months ago, I transited through Jordan and then to Turkey, where I stayed for almost a month and 20 days. We faced many problems, when the police came, sometimes they hit people, but usually they...

Migration in (out of) Context – My Story

My name is Anastasija, I am 26 years old and I come from Skopje, Macedonia. After I graduated, I spent 7 months doing a translation internship in Skopje. However, there was no possibility for employment afterwards. I tried to find a job for a few months, but to no avail.

Migration in (out of) Context – My Story

My name is Ibrahim Mardini. I come from Syria and I’m 25 years old. After graduating from the Law University in Aleppo, Syria, I worked as a salesperson in a store before the war. When the war started, I was volunteering in a humanitarian organization.

Why I moved to Aleppo. Why I stayed

If people are leaving I will leave with them. I have no idea where we will go. But wherever we go I will keep trying to treat patients, as long as my health allows I will keep saving lives. My motto in life is 'wherever I am need I will be.'"

She Swam to Escape Syria. Now She’ll Swim in Rio

“Everyone was praying,” Mardini said. “We were calling the Turkish police, the Greek police, saying: ‘Please, please help us. We have children! We are drowning!’ And they just kept saying: ‘Turn and go back. Turn and go back.’”

Aegan sea that swallows lives

Looking on my left I see children, man and women who are trying to sleep and hope that tomorrow the border will be open and they will have a human treatment .Looking at the eyes of this couple I could see fear, pain, fatigue but also a ton of hope for a humane torture …

Memories and hope

“This used to be our house, but it doesn’t exist anymore…the only thing that is left are the memories and this picture as a proof of our past family happiness “- continued this Syrian man who travels with his wife and his four children.